This abortion history timeline thoroughly explores the history of abortion, mostly in the United States.  It marks important times and events, as well as the arguments used by pro-choice abortionists and their pro-life opponents.  Some of the arguments are heated, while some are measured and reserved.  One thing is clear:  the ongoing attack on vulnerable, human life is not unique to our age.  At AbortionEssay.com, we hope that our research into the past will serve those fighting to save the lives of the pure, innocent, unborn in both the present and future.  We do this not only in the name of God, but from a basic sense of love and morality that should be inherent and innate in all of us.

 

Circa 2000 B.C.
Circa 1792 B.C.
Circa 74 A.D.
Circa 150 A.D.
Circa 177 A.D.
Circa 210 A.D.
1483–1546
1732
1839
1855
1859
1865
1876
1959
1965
1967
1968
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2009
2010
2011
2013
2014
2016

Circa 2000 B.C.

Ancient Hittite Law (17-18) dictates that anyone (presumably, a man) who causes a free woman (i.e., non-slave woman) to miscarry in the 9th month (or 10th month, based on the Hittite calendar) must pay a fine of 10 shekels of silver.  If the miscarriage occurs during the 5th month, the fine is 5 shekels of silver and the attacker's estate as security.  A later version of the law simplified the punishment to be a fine of 20 shekels of silver, apparently regardless of gestational stage.  The penalties were less severe for the forced miscarriage of a slave woman.

Circa 1792 B.C.

The Code of Hammurabi (209), circa 1792 B.C.-1750 B.C., states that if a "seignior" (i.e., ruler or feudal lord) strikes or beats another seignior's pregnant daughter to the point at which she has a miscarriage, he must pay a fine of 10 shekels of silver "for her fetus."  The fine for committing the same crime against a "commoner's daughter" is 5 shekels of silver.

Circa 74 A.D.

In the Letter of Barnabas (Epistle of Barnabas, 19:5), the Greek epistle communicates that one may not slay a child by procuring an abortion.  Likewise, one may not "destroy" the child after it is born.

Circa 150 A.D.

The Didache (or "Teaching of the Twelve Apostles"), a treatise on Christian morality and practices, clearly states (Didache; 2:2) that one may not kill/slay/abort a child or commit infanticide (i.e., murder of a newborn child).

Circa 177 A.D.

Athenagoras of Athens stated (Supplicatio 35) that the human embryo is, in fact, a human being and the object of divine protection, providence, and love.  Also, he taught that any woman who takes a drug to cause abortion is committing a murder for which she will have to answer to God.

Circa 210 A.D.

Tertullian, a Carthaginian theologian who converted to Christianity and broke away from the Catholic Church, referred to abortion as "homocidium" (i.e., "murder" or "manslaughter").

1483–1546

A german priest/monk who was the seminal leader of the Protestant Reformation, Martin Luther believed that the soul is born with the body when a child is conceived.

1732

A 1732 court transcript from the Rex v. Beare case in London, England, provides significant insight into the mindset of Eleanor Merriman-Beare.  She was indicted two times "for destroying the Foetus in the Womb" and once for "endeavouring to persuade Nicholas Wilson to poison his Wife, and for giving him Poison for that End."

1839

Dr. Hugh L. Hodge gives his "Foeticide, or Criminal Abortion" lecture in 1839 (and again in 1854) to medical students at the University of Pennsylvania.

1855

Dr. David Humphreys Storer, in 1855, influenced a generation of doctors by giving a lecture in which he describes some of the problems that were caused by abortions.  The lecture influenced his son, Horatio, to start the "Physicians' Crusade Against Abortion" in 1857.  His lecture received little attention outside of Boston, and it was not published until 1872.

1859

The American Medical Association's report on criminal abortion is a direct effect of Horatio's March and the movement against abortion among physicians.

1865

An essay by Horatio Robinson Storer, M.D., written in 1865, was a prize essay for the American Medical Association and was published by Horatio—with the AMA—in 1866, with later editions including 1868.  In this essay, Horatio gives an extensive background of induced abortions, their side effects on women, and why abortion should not be practiced.

1876

An anonymous physician (who goes by the initials of "D.H.") wrote a letter to one of his patients, a woman who was considering an abortion.  The letter was then published in the Nashville Journal of Medicine and Surgery in May of 1876.

1959

For individual states, the American Law Institute (ALI) proposes a model penal code advocating for the legalization of abortion when the mental or physical health of the mother is at risk, the pregnancy resulted from rape or incest, and fetal deformation.

1965

June 7:  In a landmark case (Griswold v. Connecticut) involving a Connecticut law that prohibited the use of contraceptives, the Supreme Court rules that the United States Constitution protects one's "right to privacy."  As such, the Supreme Court votes 7-2 to invalidate the law due to its purported violation of one's "right to marital privacy."

1967

General:  Virginia Society for Human Life (VSHL) is founded, becoming the first (and currently oldest) statewide, pro-life/right-to-life organization in the country.

April 25:  John A. Love (Colorado Governor) signs the United States' first "liberalized ALI-model law on abortion, legalizing the procedure in cases of rape, incest, or permanent physical or mental disability of the mother or child.  North Carolina, Oregon, and California pass similar laws.

1968

The National Right to Life (NRL) organization is formed to coordinate the information and goals among all state-level right-to-life organizations.  The board of directors soon diversifies to include representatives such as lawyers, doctors, housewives, educators, and nurses.

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1970

April 11:  New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller legalizes abortion-on-demand up to 24 weeks of pregnancy, signing a bill repealing New York's 1830 law that banned abortion--except to save a woman's life--any time after a pregnant woman first feels fetal movements in her uterus .  Hawaii, Washington state, and Alaska pass similar laws.

June:  At Barat College in Chicago, National Right to Life (NRL) gathers right-to-life leaders from each state for a national meeting on organizational strategy.

1971

April 21:  In its first case involving abortion (United States v. Vuitch), the United States Supreme Court uphold a Washington D.C. law allowing abortion only if the procedure will preserve a woman's life or "health."  However, since the Court's ruling specifies that "health" means "psychological and physical well-being," it effectively legalizes abortion-on-demand, for any reason.

June:  National Right to Life (NRL) first annual convention takes place at St. Paul, Minnesota's Macalester College.

1972

By the end of 1972, 13 states have passed an ALI-based law.  However, 31 states allow abortion only to save the mother's life.

Governor Rockefeller vetoes New York's repeal of its 1970 abortion law.

1973

January 22:  In the landmark Roe v. Wade case, the United States Supreme Court rules that a "right of privacy" it had earlier proclaimed does, indeed, encompass a right to abortion.  The Court establishes a trimester pregnancy schedule, according to which a state may enforce virtually no regulations or limitations on abortion.  In the second trimester, the state can enact limited regulation, but only to protect the pregnant woman's "health."  After viability has been established In the third trimester, a state can "proscribe" abortion, as long as it makes exceptions to preserve the "health" of the pregnant woman.  Also issued on January 22, 1973, Doe v. Bolton conveniently defines "health" as "all factors" affecting the woman, including "physical, emotional, psychological, familial, and the woman's age."  Such liberal wording guaranteed that virtually any reason/justification to kill the unborn child would be legally protected.

May:  National Right to Life (NRL) becomes a non-profit, 501 (c)(4) organization.

November 1:  NRL publishes the first issue of "National Right to Life (NRL) News."

1974

January 22:  The inaugural "March for Life" takes place on the west steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C..  Each year, on the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade ruling, thousands of pro-life activists attend the "March for Life."

November 6:  With the help of new pro-life groups during the first significant, statewide political contest after Roe v. Wade, pro-life Senator Bob Dole (R-Ks.) defeats Congressman William Roy (a physician who carried out many abortions).

1975

February 15: Kenneth C. Edelin, a Boston-area abortionist, is convicted of manslaughter for killing an unborn child.

March 10: United States Senators James L. Buckley (Conservative Party of New York) and Jesse Helms (R-NC) introduce the first "Human Life Amendment."

1976

April 28:  A "test vote" on the Human Life Amendment in the United States Senate secures only 40 votes, far short of the 67 (two-thirds vote) required to enact a new amendment to the Constitution.

June 28:  Sponsored by Representative Henry Hyde (R-Il.), the first Hyde Amendment is approved by the United States House of Representatives.  With very limited exceptions, the amendment to the DHHS appropriations bill bans Medicaid funding for abortions.

July 1:  In Planned Parenthood of Central Missouri v. Danforth, the court blocked parental consent requirements for minors seeking an abortion and declared that married fathers have no legal rights in abortion processes or decisions.  The Court also struck down Missouri's attempt to ban abortion procedures that use saline amniocentesis.

December 17:  The Massachusetts Superior Judicial Court overturns the manslaughter conviction of abortionist Edelin, declaring that a legal abortion may be deemed manslaughter only if the newborn infant is definitively alive after leaving the mother's body.

1977

February:  Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life (MCCL), an affiliate of NRLC, launches its "Mission Possible" project to provide organizational development and funding assistance to new state right-to-life organizations in the United States (primarily in the the southeast).

June 20:  In three cases (Beal v. Doe, Poelker v. Doe, and Maher v. Roe), the United States Supreme Court maintains that neither state nor federal governments are legally required to provide abortion funding as part of public assistance programs (even if cases of "medical necessity").

July:  NRLC launches its "Pro-Life Legal Action Project" to secure judicial application of pro-life goals and provide/fund the legal defense for right-to-life legislation.

1979

June:  National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL) co-founder Doctor Bernard Nathanson releases an important pro-life book (Aborting America) in which he renounces the pro-abortion agenda and exposes the lies perpetrated by pro-abortion activists who seek to nullify pro-life legislation that protects the unborn child.

September 15-16:  The National Right to Life Political Action Committee (NRL PAC) is founded.

1980

January 10:  In defense of the Hyde Amendment, NRLC files an amicus curiae brief with the United States Supreme Court.

June 30:  In upholding the Hyde Amendment in Harris v. McRae, the United States Supreme Court reasserts that women have no constitutional right to public funding for abortion procedures.

November 4:  In the first year that NRL PAC asserts its role in elections, Ronald Reagan and George Bush, pro-life candidates on the Republican ticket, easily defeat Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale, the incumbent pro-abortion president and vice president on the Democrat ticket.  Also, in a resounding statement by the American people, 11 senate seats switched from anti-life to pro-life senators.

1981

March 23:  The United States Supreme Court approves a Utah parental notification law in H.L. v. Matheson.  When an abortion is scheduled for an underage (i.e., minor) girl who still lives in her parents' home as a dependent of her parents, the law requires the abortion doctor to immediately contact and provide notification to the parents.

July 9:  A bill sponsored by Senator Helms designed to challenge or ultimately overturn Roe v. Wade is approved by a United States Senate subcommittee.

December 16:  A constitutional amendment advanced by Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) proclaiming that the Constitution does not guarantee a "right to abortion" is approved by a United States Senate subcommittee.

1982

March 10:  Potentially giving the states and Congress joint authority to regulate abortion, the Senate Judiciary Committee approves the Hatch Amendment.

March 27-28:  A resolution in support of the Hatch Amendment, the Human Life Bill, and the NRLC Unity Amendment is approved by the NRLC Board of Directors.

April:  An experimental test of abortifacient RU-486 was able to abort 11 women, announces Doctor Etienne-Emile Beaulieu, a researcher from French pharmaceutical company Roussel Uclaf.

September 15:  A pro-abortion (i.e., anti-child) filibuster in the United States Senate blocks the Helms bill from challenging/overturning Roe v. Wade.

1983

June 15:  The United States Supreme Court (in Akron v. Akron Center for Reproductive Health) nullifies state directives that post-third trimester abortions be performed in a hospital, right-to-know laws for women, and post-receipt-of-abortion-information waiting periods for abortion-seeking women to be able to legally consent to an abortion.  However, individual states may dictate that only licensed physicians/practitioners can perform abortion procedures.

June 28:  By a 49-50 vote, the United States Senate turns down the pro-life Eagleton-Hatch Amendment, which had asserted "a right to an abortion is not secured by the Constitution."  A two-thirds majority vote is required to pass a proposed amendment to the Constitution.

November 10:  To ban the use of federal employee health benefits programs to fund abortion procedures (except to save the life of the mother), the United States Congress approves the Ashbrook Amendment.

1984

June 17:  To deny funding to foreign organizations that perform/promote abortion as a form of "family planning" outside of the United States, President Ronald Reagan announces the "Mexico City Policy."

November 6:  Incumbent, pro-life POTUS Ronald Reagan is re-elected (58.8%-40.6%), handily defeating the Democratic, anti-life ticket of former Vice President Mondale and Representative Geraldine Ferraro.  Reagan wins every state except Minnesota, which he lost by a slim 49.72%-49.54% margin.

1985

January 7:  NRLC premiers its daily radio program, "Pro-Life Perspective."

June:  National Teens for Life (NTL) is founded.

July 10:  By a margin of 45 votes, the United States House once again affirms the "Mexico City Policy."  Also, with the enactment of the Kemp/Kasten Amendment, any organization involved with coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization becomes ineligible for United States population-assistance funds.

July 15:  In filing a friend-of-the-court brief in the Thornburgh case, the United States Justice Department implores the Supreme Court to overturn or nullify Roe v. Wade.

1986

June 11:  The United States Supreme Court (in Thornburgh v. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) nullifies state laws forcing abortionists to employ the abortion method that is most likely to allow for birth in post-viability abortions.  It also nullifies right-to-know laws for women and post-receipt-of-abortion-information waiting periods for abortion-seeking women to be able to legally consent to an abortion.

September 17:  Pro-abortion senators, including Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Ma.), fail to prevent President Reagan from promoting William Rehnquist from associate to chief justice.  Antonin Scalia receives confirmation to fill Rehnquist's vacated position as an associate justice.

1987

July 30:  President Reagan declares ineligible for Title 10 funding any program that offers referrals/counseling for abortion procedures as a "family planning" method.

August 25:  To publicize and promote adoption as an abortion alternative, President Reagan establishes a task force at the federal level.

October 23:  The United States Senate rejects, by a vote of 58-42, the nomination of Robert Bork (a pro-life Judge) to the United States Supreme Court.  Bork's defeat was the result of vicious, propagandistic campaigns by pro-abortion (i.e., anti-child) groups.  The vacant seat eventually came to be occupied by Anthony Kennedy, who voted to reaffirm Roe in 1992.

1988

March:  President Reagan orders a moratorium on new fetal tissue transplant research funded by the federal government.

July 2:  The constitutionality of Reagan's regulations banning Title 10 programs from participating in abortion procedures/referrals is upheld by the United States District Court in New York.

September 23:  Licensing of RU-486 for use in France is approved by the French government.

September 26:  An "Import Bulletin" prohibiting the importation of RU-486 for personal use is issued by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

September 30:  Washington D.C. is immediately barred from funding abortions or carrying out abortions in its city-managed hospital by way of the United States Senate passing an amendment to the District of Columbia appropriations bill (which had already been passed by the United States House of Representatives).

October 29:  Roussel Uclaf is ordered by the French government to rescind its Oct. 27 resolution to cease distributing the RU-486 abortion pill.

November 8:  Pro-life, incumbent V.P. George Bush and Dan Quayle defeat the anti-life, Democratic ticket of Michael Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen, 53.4% to 45.6%.

1989

April 9:  A pro-abortion rally is held in Washington, D.C.  A Park Police captain refutes bias media reports of a crowd of "300,000" by telling congressmen that the crowd was estimated at only 75,000-85,000.

July 3:  The United States Supreme Court--while upholding certain aspects of a Missouri law during the Webster v. Reproductive Health Services case--rules that the federal Constitution does not compel government to make hospitals or other public facilities available for hosting abortion procedures.

November 17:  Representative Don Edwards (D-Ca.) and Senator Alan Cranston (D-Ca.) introduce in the House and Senate, respectively, the purported "Freedom of Choice Act."

November 18:  The Abortion Control Act is signed by Pennsylvania Governor Robert Casey.

November 22:  A foreign aid appropriations bill is vetoed by President Bush due to its inclusion of the Mikulski Amendment, which would have reinstated the United States' monetary support of UNFPA, an organization that spearheaded the coercive program to control China's population.  Such a program violates the Kemp-Kasten Amendment of 1985, which forbids United States "population assistance" to organizations that participate in and/or support involuntary sterilization or coerced abortion.

1990

March 7:  Planned Parenthood's lawsuit challenging the "Mexico City Policy" is dismissed by a New York federal court.

March 30:  A law prohibiting abortion as a birth control method is vetoed by Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus.

April 28:  The NRLC-sponsored "Rally for Life" draws more than 300,000 pro-life supporters to Washington, D.C..

May 22:  Roussel Uclaf changes its policies and will market the RU-486 abortion drug outside of France, the Washington Post reports.

June 25:  Based on a judicial bypass procedure, the United States Supreme Court upholds a one-parent notification requirement in Ohio v. Akron Center for Reproductive Health.  In Hodgson v. Minnesota, the Court affirms the constitutionality of a judicial bypass, two-parent notification law.

June 26:  President Bush reiterates his pledge to support/maintain both the "Mexico City Policy" (which denies funding to foreign organizations that perform/promote abortion as a form of "family planning" outside of the U.S.) and the Kemp/Kasten Amendment in a letter to pivotal leaders in the United States House.

June 27:  By a vote of 224-198, the United States House scraps a proposal to fund multiple organizations or associations that promote/sponsor abortion in underdeveloped countries.

July 1-4:  David Shaw documents the media's widespread, insidious, pro-abortion bias in a 4-part series in the Los Angeles Times entitled, "Abortion and the Media."

August 1:  Rejecting a proposal to break from its traditionally neutral stance on abortion, the AFL-CIO Executive Council refrains from taking a pro-abortion position for the union.

1991

January 25:  In ruling that the government did not have the authority to compel Roussel Uclaf to restart distributing the RU-486 abortion pill, the French Council of State erases Roussel's convenient "we had no choice" excuse.

May 23:  In upholding Bush Administration regulations, the United States Supreme Court (in Rust v. Sullivan) continues to allow the prohibition of customary counseling and abortion referrals in approximately 4,000 clinics that collect federal funds for Title 10 "family planning."

June 3:  President Bush sends a warning letter to Thomas Foley, House Speaker, in which Bush promises to veto any legislation that weakens existing abortion regulations/laws.

June 18:  In overriding Governor Buddy Romer's veto of a state law, the Louisiana legislature protects unborn children from abortion (except when the mother's life is at risk or the pregnancy resulted from incest/rape).

July 1:  Pro-life Judge Clarence Thomas is nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court by President Bush.

October 15:  Judge Thomas is confirmed, 52-48, by the United States Senate.

October 25:  Despite having one arm viciously cut off at the shoulder, baby Ana Rosa Rodriguez survives an abortion attempt in the 3rd-trimester by Abu Hayat, a New York abortionist (i.e., mutilator of a defenseless child).

November:  President Bush successfully vetoes an HHS appropriations bill for $205 billion because it includes stipulations that would have prevented pro-life regulations from being enforced.

President Reagan's ban on abortion procedures within United States military bases (except to save the life of the mother) is kept in place, thanks to a veto threat from President Bush.

1992

February:  President Bush issues a veto threat against legislation that would earmark federal funds for research that relies on abortion (e.g., tissue/organs from aborted babies).

March 5:  Vowing that it will never become law while he is in Office, President Bush denounces the extremely radical, far left "Freedom of Choice Act."

June 29:  Although the United States Supreme Court reaffirms the core holdings of Roe (in Planned Parenthood v. Casey), it modifies Roe by eliminating the trimester scheme, upholds key restrictions on abortion, and adopts the "undue burden" test of abortion laws (by a 6-3 vote).  For a particular regulation/provision to be declared unconstitutional, opponents must now prove that it creates an "undue burden on a woman's right to abortion."

July 13:  By a mere 14-vote margin, the United States House affirms President Bush's veto of a bill that would earmark federal funds for research that relies on abortion (e.g., tissue/organs from aborted babies).

September 13:  At a National Abortion Foundation seminar, abortionist Martin Haskell describes "partial-birth abortion" procedures, which involve delivering all but the defenseless baby's head, callously penetrating the tiny skull with a sharp instrument of death, and sucking out the infant's brain.

November 3:  Governor Bill Clinton and Senator Al Gore (pro-abortion candidates on the Democratic ticket) defeat incumbent, pro-life President George Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle.

1993

January 22:  In overturning Title 10 regulations that ban federal employees from providing abortion referrals, repealing the Mexico City Policy, nullifying fetal tissue transplant bans, directing hospitals on military bases to perform abortion procedures, and requesting that the FDA review the RU-486 import ban, President Clinton's 5 executive orders reverse many years of pro-life victories.

February 22:  For attempting to murder defenseless baby Ana Rosa Rodriguez in the guise of abortion, abortionist Abu Hayat is rightly convicted of illegal abortion and assault.

March 8:  An appeal of a lower court's ruling that struck down Louisiana's protective abortion law is refused audience by the United States Supreme Court.

April 14:  Bill and Hillary Clinton plan to include elective abortion coverage in their pending health care plan proposal to Congress, according to an article in the Los Angeles Times.

May 12:  At United States Air Force, Navy, and Army hospitals in Europe, all obstetrics staff members refuse to carry out abortions, even though they are authorized to do so by Bill Clinton's executive order (according to an article in NRL News).

June 18:  At venues all around the United States, pro-lifers demonstrate and rally against the RU-486 abortion drug.

June 30:  By an 85-vote margin, the United States House extends the Hyde Amendment.  Also, a lobbying campaign backed by NRLC defeats the purported "Freedom of Choice Act," a federal statute proposal that, if passed, would have invalidated even the most limited forms of Supreme Court-permitted regulation on state abortion.

November 22:  President Clinton announces a plan to provide $75 million over the next five years to the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF).

December 28:  President Clinton orders the Medicaid director in every state to change the laws in his/her state to fund abortion when a pregnancy results from incest or rape (based on the word of ever-so-honest and ethical abortionists).

1994

January:  The executive board of the American Council of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) makes theirs the first national physicians' association to recommend/advocate training non-surgeons/physicians to carry out abortion procedures.

February 3:  Sending a powerful message to Hillary and Bill Clinton at the National Prayer Breakfast, Mother Teresa says, "the greatest destroyer of peace today is abortion."

April 20:  In New York City, the first annual "Proudly Pro-Life Awards Banquet" takes place.

May 15:  The Population Council receives a donation from Roussel Uclaf in the form of United States patent rights for the RU-486 abortion pill.

June 30:  In Madsen v. Women's Center Inc., the United States Supreme Court says judges may create buffer zones to keep pro-life demonstrators away from abortion clinics.

September 26:  Despite plans to the contrary for the current session, Democrats do not introduce the Clinton Health Care Plan in the United States Senate.  The Clintons' goal of forcing every American into a socialist, national health system that rations life-saving care while funding abortion-on-demand is defeated, thanks largely to a significant, NRLC-led lobbying and public education campaign.

October 27:  RU-486 testing has begun in the United States, proclaims the Population Council.

November 8:  In congressional elections nationwide, not one pro-life Congress member (Republican or Democrat) loses to his/her pro-abortion opponent.  While taking majority control of both houses of Congress, pro-life Republicans gain about 40 votes in the House and 6 votes in the Senate.

1995

March 30:  In publishing his encyclical "The Gospel of Life" (Evangelium Vitae), Pope John Paul II issues a plea to defend human life at its most vulnerable stage.

June:  National College Students for Life (NCSL) is established.

June 14:  The Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act (PBABA) is introduced in the United States House of Representatives by Charles Canady (R-Fl.).

August 10:  On the television show, Nightline, "Jane Roe" (whose real name is Norma McCorvey) of Roe v. Wade tells millions of viewers that she now completely forsakes and condemns abortion and the anti-life movement.  She supports unborn children's inherent right to life.  She previously divulged that her pregnancy was not the result of rape, proving that Roe was based entirely on deception and well-contrived lies.

August 18:  At nrlc.org, NRLC's first Web site appears online.

August 22:  Rightly convicted of 2nd-degree murder in the failed-abortion death of pregnant, would-be mother Guadalupe Negron, abortionist David Benjamin becomes the first New York "abortionist" (i.e., baby killer) to receive a murder conviction.

November 1:  With a 288-139 vote, the United States House enacts the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act, making it the first federal legislation/bill to ban a particular type of abortion since Roe v. Wade.

December 7:  With a vote of 54-44, the United States Senate enacts the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act.

1996

April 10:  The Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act suffers its first veto at the hands of President Bill Clinton.

May 2:  Instituted to shield medical personnel (and training programs) from being forced to participate against their will in performing and/or training in abortion procedures, President Clinton hesitantly signs a new federal law/measure as part of a large spending bill package.

July 19:  The FDA's "Reproductive Health Advisory Committee" advocates for the FDA to approve RU-486 marketing to women under 50 days of pregnancy.

September 11:  The Food and Drug Administration sanctions a national study of methotrexate and misoprostol (another combination of abortifacient drugs), announces Planned Parenthood.

September 18:  The Food and Drug Administration requests that the Population Council provide additional information on manufacturing and labeling practices in order to qualify RU-486 for public sale and marketing.

November 5:  Pro-life Republicans Bob Dole and Jack Kemp lose to pro-abortion President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore.

1997

January:  To highlight the incessant pro-abortion bias in mainstream media analysis of the partial-birth abortion debate, PBS airs the documentary, "Media Matters."

February:  Head of the National Coalition of Abortion Providers (NCAP), Ron Fitzsimmons, confesses to journalists that he shamelessly lied when he claimed that partial-birth abortions are rare and carried out only in extreme circumstances and/or cases of extraordinary medical necessity, admitting that he merely parroted the prevailing propaganda of other pro-abortion leaders/groups.

March 20:  With a veto-proof vote of 295-136, the House enacts the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act.

April 8:  Hoechst AG announces its plan to cease all future distribution, marketing, and production of the RU-486 abortion drug, electing to transfer all of the abortifacient's U.S. rights to the Population Council and all worldwide rights to former Roussel Uclaf president, Edouard Sakiz.

May 20:  The Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act is endorsed by the American Medical Association's Board of Trustees.

May 21:  Although it is 3 votes shy of being veto-proof (64-36), the United States Senate's second vote to enact the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act is successful.

June 16:  A Montana law mandating that abortions may not be performed by physicians' assistants is upheld by the United States Supreme Court.

October 10:  The ban on partial-birth abortions is once again vetoed by Bill Clinton, with full support from Hillary Clinton.

December 8:  NRLC is dubbed the country's 10th most powerful public interest group by Fortune magazine.  In stark contrast, the National Abortion and Reproduction Rights Action League (NARRAL) is far behind at #43, with Planned Parenthood pulling up the rear at #65.

1998

February 12:  The Child Custody Protection Act (CCPA) is introduced in the United States Senate by Senator Spencer Abraham (R-Mi.).  The act of an adult transporting a minor across state lines to undergo an abortion would be made illegal if that act circumvents the parental involvement law of the state in which the child lives.

April 1:  The Child Custody Protection Act CCPA) is introduced in the United States House of Representatives by Representative Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fl.).

April 30:  The New England Journal of Medicine publishes the results of a United States trial of RU-486.  Despite the serious complications suffered by countless women, the biased Population Council deems that the drug is "safe."

1999

December:  Northeastern University in Boston report abortion has contributed to significant underpopulation in the northeastern United States.  In fact, birthrates have so acutely fallen that--in an unprecedented development--New England is now forced to heavily rely on foreign immigrants to maintain and replenish its workforce.

2000

June 28:  By a slim 5-4 margin, the Supreme Court votes to nullify Nebraska's late-term abortion ban in Stenberg v. Carhart.  Five of the justices proclaim that the Nebraska law (and those like it in 29 other states), unfairly places an "undue burden" on a woman's "right" to kill her child, since it does not contain an exemption for saving/preserving a woman's life/health and could be used to outlaw multiple types of abortion procedures.

2001

January 22:  George W. Bush, just 2 days after officially becoming POTUS, signs an executive order prohibiting United States aid to foreign groups and/or international organizations that support abortion through foreign government lobbying, suggesting to the public that abortion is an acceptable option for "family-planning," or directly carrying out the callous procedure.

2002

July:  As agreed in April, the Food and Drug Administration removes the warning from second part of the RU-486 abortion drug (Cytotec).  Because doctors often use the drug to induce labor, the FDA's new label conveniently states that a woman should avoid getting pregnant if taking Cytotec as an ulcer treatment.

October:  The Alan Guttmacher Institute publishes a study indicating that the abortion rate in the United States has substantially dropped since 1994.  From 1994 to 2000, the rate fell from 24 abortions per every 1,000 childbearing-age women to only 21.

2003

January:  Doctors feel pressure--deservedly so--to educate women about a long-known breast cancer risk ("delayed first-term pregnancy effect") and readily available research on abortion being a distinctly possible breast cancer risk, thanks to a study on the psychological and physical ramifications of abortion.  (While the rates for most other cancers declined from 1973 to 1998, a 2001 NCI report on cancer in the U.S. indicated that the breast cancer rate increased by an astonishing 40%.  Not coincidentally, Roe v. Wade was decided on January 22, 1973.)

February 17:  The autopsy report of the Alameda County Coroner states that 18-year-old Holly Patterson of California died from an "incomplete abortion" as a result of taking the RU-486 abortion drug.

August:  George W. Bush broadens the pro-life "Mexico City Policy" by clarifying that it applies to the State Department's funding of all population programs, whether or not such programs are USAID-funded.

November 5:  To finally end the reprehensible, evil procedure of partial-birth abortion, President George W. Bush signs into law the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003.

2004

April 1:  President George W. Bush signs into law the Congress-passed "Unborn Victims of Violence Act," otherwise known as "Laci and Conner's Law."

May 20:  Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS) introduces to the United States House the "Unborn Child Pain Awareness Act."  Senator Chris Smith (R-NJ) introduces a similar bill.  The bills' goal is to ensure that each abortion-seeking woman is made fully aware of the pain that her innocent, unborn child will endure while being viciously mutilated-to-death at her request.

June 2:  The Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act is nullified by California Federal Judge Phyllis Hamilton, with similar decisions expected in New York's and Nebraska's federal courts.

August 2:  The partial-birth abortion injunction ordered by Federal Judge Phyllis Hamilton is appealed in the 9th United States Circuit Court of Appeals by President George W. Bush, with the expectation that the United States Supreme Court will ultimately decide the case.

August 26:  The federal government can't enforce the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act on the grounds that the law conflicts with the Supreme Court's earlier 5-4 ruling that made partial-birth abortion legal, says New York Federal District Judge Richard Casey.

September 14:  A motion forwarded by Norma McCorvey (better known as "Roe" in the Roe v. Wade case) to reverse 1973's landmark decision to make abortion legal in the U.S. is dismissed by a circuit court judge.

November 29:  A brief in the appeal of Nebraska Judge Richard Kopf's decision to overturn the federal partial-birth abortion ban is filed by the U.S. Justice Department.  President George W. Bush asks the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn Judge Kopf's decision.

2005

January 8:  In support of Congress' partial-birth abortion ban, lawyers at the Center for Law & Religious Freedom submit a "friend of the court" brief in Missouri's 8th Circuit Court of Appeals.  They contend that Nebraska's lower court made a mistake in proclaiming that the Constitution requires 2003's Partial-Birth Abortion Act to contain a special allowance for the mother's health.

July 8:  Ruling that the nation-wide partial-birth abortion ban is unconstitutional, Missouri's 8th Circuit Court of Appeals justifies its decision by blaming the bill's lack of a special allowance for the mother's health.

2006

February 21:  The United States Supreme Court reveals that it will hear the case regarding the Partial-Birth Abortion Act's constitutionality.

February 28:  Pro-life demonstrators at abortion clinics can't be silenced by extortion laws, rules the United States Supreme Court for the 3rd time.

March 6:  The United States' first abortion law since the Roe v. Wade decision is signed into law by the Governor of South Dakota, Mike Rounds.  It outlaws most abortions in South Dakota, with the key exception of abortions that must be carried out in order to save would-be mothers' lives.  Physicians risk a felony charge of 5 years imprisonment and a fine of $5,000 if convicted of carrying out an abortion.

June 17:  A statewide abortion ban is signed into law by Kathleen Blanco, Louisiana Governor.  Modeled after South Dakota's new law from three months earlier, it will not take effect unless the United States Supreme Court reverses the Roe v. Wade decision or the United States Constitution gets amended to permit abortion bans in individual states.  Physicians risk a felony charge of 10 years imprisonment and a fine of $100,000 if convicted of carrying out an abortion.

August 24:  The over-the-counter (OTC) "Plan B" (or "morning after pill") contraceptive drug is approved by the FDA for women who are at least 18 years old.

2007

April 18:  The Gonzalez v. Carhart ruling is upheld by the United States Supreme Court by a vote of 5-4, thereby maintaining the Partial-Birth Abortion Act's ban of abhorrent partial-birth abortion procedures.

2009

January 23:  To nullify the ban that had prohibited the United States from funding international "family planning" organizations that offer abortion advice/procedures, the "Mexico City Policy" is repealed by President Obama.

May 10:  For the first time, more Americans identify as "pro-life" than "pro-choice," reveals a Gallup poll.

2010

March 23:  President Obama signs into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (a.k.a, "ACA" or "Obamacare").

April 13:  The Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is passed by Nebraska, which becomes the first state to do so.  Based on the scientifically-proven pain that abortion unleashes on the defenseless, unborn child, the law outlaws abortion any time after 20 weeks of gestation.

2011

The number of abortions is at its lowest level since Roe v. Wade, suggests Alan Guttmacher Institute's research.  The number remains steady at approximately 1,200,000 procedures reported in 2011, which marks a 25% decrease from 1990's all-time high.

2013

General:  Seventy abortion restriction laws are passed by 23 states in 2013, trailing only 2011 for the single-year record for new restrictions on abortion.  From 2011 through 2013, more abortion limitations are signed into law than during the entire decade of 2000 through 2010.

May:  Two years after being charged with the crimes, Kermit Gosnell (American abortionist and serial killer) is convicted of the vicious, first degree murder of 3 live-born, defenseless infants and the involuntary manslaughter death of an adult woman.  He is also convicted of hundreds of counts of illegal late-term abortion and violating informed consent laws.

Gosnell owned a clinic (Women's Medical Society) in Philadelphia.  In 2011, he and several of his employees were charged with defying Pennsylvania's 24-hour informed consent law (227 misdemeanor counts), carrying out illegal abortions in violation of Pennsylvania's 24-weeks-of-gestation restriction (24 felony counts), and murder (8 counts).

The murder charges involved 7 live-born, perfectly viable/normal/healthy infants (who Gosnell callously slaughtered—entirely outside of the womb—by using scissors to stab and cut their tiny spinal cords) and Karnamaya Mongar, a woman who died as a result of Gosnell's abortion attempt.

In return for the prosecution's pledge to not seek the death penalty, Gosnell voluntarily waived his post-conviction right to appeal.  Instead of receiving the death penalty, he was sentenced to life in prison (without parole).

2014

Approximately 954,000 abortions take place in 2014, based on state-level data, which is a 2.95% decrease from the approximately 983,000 in 2013 and a 6.47% decrease from the approximately 1,020,000 in 2012.

2016

General:  The newest research from the Alan Guttmacher Institute indicates a substantial reduction (-13%) in abortions from 2008 to 2011, with higher percentages attributed to clinics that perform 1,000+ abortions per year.  However, despite the general decline, abortions caused by chemical abortifacients (such as RU-486) increased.

November:  Since 2010, there has been a 35% increase in chemical abortifacient (such as RU-486) usage among women in America, according to a report from Reuters.  The news agency discovered, after reviewing 2014 data from Planned Parenthood (the biggest abortion syndicate in the United States), that chemical abortifacient-induced abortions are steadily increasing (even though overall abortion procedure numbers are declining).  Chemically-induced abortions now constitute 43% of all abortions provided by PP.  The percentage in 2010 was only 35%.

 

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